May 23, 2015: Day 84 of 365 Daily Posts – Quinault Lodge Walk

In early May of this year (May 8th and 9th) my wife and I went to the Olympic Peninsula for the day.  We needed a break from the house routine and all the work we’ve been doing around the yard.  It’s been quite some time since we’ve been to the coast and we were excited about the day trip.  We planned to spend some time at the Quinault Lodge, have some lunch and then go for a walk along one of the many trails in the forest.  Trail distances vary dependent upon which trail you chose and today we decided to walk one  of the shorter ones – a couple of miles to allow enough time to drive north to Kalaloch Lodge to walk along the beach for a while and then to Ruby beach, a beach we’ve been too many times over the years.  As you can imagine it’s our favorite beach.  We had no set schedule and looked forward to the journey.

From where we live, it takes about three hours or so to arrive at the Quinault Lodge.  It’s another hour to the Kalaloch Lodge and from there to Ruby beach is another 10 – 15 minutes.  This is a routine well known to us from all our trips to the coast.  At the same time, we also allowed ourselves the option of staying overnight if needed.

We made good time to the Quinault lodge and looked forward to our walk.

Quinault Lodge is located in a rain forest and when you walk through the woods you’re surrounded by lush, cool green vegetation, moss hanging from trees of all sizes, and sun dappled paths as you make you way deeper in to the woods.  There are streams, babbling brooks (yes, I really said that), small waterfalls as the water tumbles it way over stones and around fallen trees.  It’s truly a wondrous walk.

Although I didn’t take a lot of pictures during the walk, I would like to share some images with you.  (Please note all images taken with the Nikon Df and 28mm lens)

 

Fallen logs in stream

Fallen logs in stream

The next image is a “nurse” log.  Once a tree falls, it becomes a part of the forest ecosystem by providing a place for other trees to grown as well as providing nutrients to the soil as it breaks down.

"Nurse" tree

“Nurse” tree

A cedar tree so wide that my wife’s outstretched arms couldn’t be seen on either side…two shots, the first the tree; the next tree with her hand intentionally protruding from one edge (really, it’s there).

 

 

Really, my wife is behind this tree with her arms outstreched but the tree is so wide, her hands cannot be seen

Really, my wife is behind this tree with her arms outstreched but the tree is so wide, her hands cannot be seen

Same cedar with my wife's right hand intentionally sticking out

Same cedar with my wife’s right hand intentionally sticking out

Typical moss throughout the walk

A strand of moss covered trees

A strand of moss covered trees

As the trees fall, they end up in the craziest positions;

Jumbled trees

Jumbled trees

And finally, the tall cedar we call “Hern”.  It’s easily well over 100′ high.

 

The cedar we call Hern

The cedar we call Hern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tomorrow’s post will be about the Kalaloch phase of our day trip.

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